This is why it's important to read good books!

Why Brave?

 

This is why it's important to read good books!
Image from Pixabay. Edits by me.

 

This is one of my favorite lines.

I’m sure we’ve all heard some variation of this line from different sources. I first heard it from my Mom. It is the reason I write Children’s Stories, MG Stories, and YA Stories. It’s the reason books intended for a young audience are some of my favorites.

Life is hard. Life is often scary.

Children can’t be protected from everything. It’s impossible to keep evil influences and harm from your children. You are only one human being. You can’t be there when nightmares come. You can’t be there when they make stupid decisions that put them in dark places. You can’t be there every waking moment.  And, you shouldn’t be. Children don’t grow up by being protected.

But!!!!

Children can be armed.

Children can be trained. Children can be groomed for the fight that is this life.

Stories are a great way to prepare kids for the things they will face as they go out in the world.

 

Why Fairy Tales are important.
Image from Pixabay. Edits by me.

 

I’m not really into Issue Driven fiction. I wasn’t as a kid, and I don’t write it. I read and write Fantasy. Why? How does that help Children be Brave?

Fantasy gives kids and young adults something fun to read that they can hold onto while also escaping the hardships or humdrum around them. As a pre-teen, I had no interest in reading about kids struggling with drugs. I did want to read every Hardy Boys I could get my hands on. I didn’t want to read about someone’s sparkly boyfriend, but I did want to read about Sam and Frodo’s struggles through Mordor.

Then I grew up. I grew up and found out I wasn’t going to solve crimes, or be asked to go on some epic adventure. I was going to get married, co-own a business with my husband, struggle in my marriage, struggle with infertility, sell our business, learn to manage my home, have health issues, and then stand shoulder to shoulder with my husband as he took on a pastorate. None of that is as thrilling as journeying through Moria, or fighting the great and evil General Woundwort, or sailing with Fin Button.

But it is all hard.

What has encouraged me, outside of Scripture? What has the Lord used during dark days?

Stories.

 

Favorite Quotes
Image from Pixabay. Edits by me.

 

When things are dark and hard, I am reminded of all my heroes who carried on. I’m reminded of all the warriors I’ve read of, big and small, strong and weak. I’m reminded of Sam, my favorite hero, only a gardener far from home. I’m reminded of Bigwig who followed Hazel faithfully, even though he was stronger than Hazel. I’m reminded of Jane Eyre, who did what was right when it hurt.  I recall story after story after story that my Mom read to me, handed to me, recommend to me, where the heroes didn’t stop. They kept moving forward. They kept pushing. They endured to the end.

Darkness is a passing thing.
Image from Pixabay. Edits by me.

This is the gift I want to give to others. I want other children, pre-teens, and teens to be able to read Jonah’s story, and then look at their normal, ordinary struggles and carry on. I want my faerie stories to be encouraged them to keep fighting even when it hurts. I want them to have heroes who defeat the dragons…or in my case the clowns. 😉

I want to write stories that help kids be brave before they have to be, because they will have to be some day, probably sooner rather than later.

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Why Warrior Stories? (Part 2)

Why Warrior Stories_
I’ve loved brotherhood stories my whole life. Most of my favorite books and movies, my favorite stories, have a central brotherhood core. This is the Fellowship in Lord of the Rings, Madmartigan and Willow, the rabbits in Watership Down, the four heroes of Final Fantasy XV, and many more. I love the bond between men who face the world together. I love the women who stand at their sides, or even care for their homes and children while they fight the world. I love HearthKeepers and Huntsman. (Which is actually one of the YA series I’m always working on.)
I believe that both men and women can be warriors, I just think that warrior-ness expresses itself differently. (The world thinks it’s the same, but it’s not. I’m not a man. I’m not going to be the same type of warrior my husband, brothers, and fathers are. I’m going to be a warrior the way my mothers are, my sisters, and my dear friends. I’m going to stand by my husband and guard his back, guard his home, keep things going. I want him free to face the dark world, and protect me. That kind of female warrior-ness takes great courage, sacrifice, and fortitude. And that’s a big rabbit trail.)
As I’ve gotten older, I realized this magical bond, this brotherhood, is most starkly seen in war stories. War exaggerates the bond between men. When I finally sat up and took note of that, I started working through every war movie I could find. My current ‘Top Five Favorite Movies’ are Rambo 4, Fury, Lone Survivor, Gladiator, and Lord of the Rings. I love 13 Hours. And yes, Band of Brothers is my second favorite TV Show right after Firefly. I am slowly but surely collecting all the books written by and about the Band of Brothers. I can’t get enough of brotherhood war movies.
I think that real spiritual warfare is our day-in-day-out, ordinary battle against our own sin, the corruption of the world, and false teaching. This is spiritual warfare. If you were able to look at an ordinary church with TrueSight goggles, you would see a gathering of dirty, broken, bleeding warriors filling the pews. I think images of battles—be it the Somme, or somewhere in the Middle East—are a more accurate representation of our daily lives as saints still in this world, than anything else. And I think our love of our local church members should be as strong as the bond between brothers in combat. We are in the trenches together and we should see it that way.
In Lone Survivor they say, “Never out of the fight.” If that’s not true about you and your battle against your own sin, I don’t know what is.
These are the two reasons I love, love, love warrior stories: brotherhood and spiritual warfare.
I also love the idea of standing up for what you believe and for who you love, with violence.
We live in a world that no longer respects the idea of defending your and yours with strength and a weapon. We have become so acclimated to a tame world, that men who willingly stand up against the darkness, or just stand up to a bully, are labelled a bully themselves. We think violence isn’t our right, but only something uneducated rednecks indulge in, or only the government can be trusted with. We believe violence doesn’t solve anything, but we forget we live in a fallen world.
This world will never be heaven.
This world is broken and God isn’t planning on fixing it. He isn’t here to save the physical world.
You can’t stop someone intent on hurting you or your family or your country with nice words or by calling the government.
All you can do is cock your gun and pull the trigger.
This is reality.
The anti-violence attitude puts all of us not only in a sad state, but a dangerous one. We aren’t teaching our boys to defend others with their strength, but to sit down and act like girls. We aren’t teaching girls to have their man’s back, but to take over. We’re teaching girls that they can be just like a man, that they don’t need him, and that his innate warrior-ness is dangerous. It is dangerous, but it isn’t necessarily evil. You need a man to be dangerous, but you need him to control his danger so it is his servant not his master. Men who are abusive should be taken out by the men who aren’t, immediately. But, you can’t just say all signs of strength are bad. That leaves our homes, and our streets, and our countries undefended and open to attack.
This is another reason I love Warrior Stories. This is why I write warrior stories. The power of brotherhoods, real spiritual warfare, and the need for violence enflame me.

Warrior Stories are myRight
Do I think it’s weird that I, a woman, love Warrior Stories? Nope. I don’t. I think women are the holders. I think we’re the rememberes. We are the ones who sacrifice sons and husbands to these horrors. We are the ones who have to defend our homes when they’re gone. We’re the raisers of the next generation of warriors. Warrior stories are my right as a women. I want to know what my man faces, be it in the true realities of war, or be it the less dramatic, every day, ordinary strength he has to show. I want to know. I want to hold. I want to remember. I want to raise.
I also think we’re the HearthKeepers. My husband is a pastor. He is a warrior, in my mind. He wages war against false doctrine and false teachers. He stands up to lies for the sake of his church. He also works full time to provide for us. So, he works a full time job, comes home and studies, and then preaches on Sunday. He works and studies, works and studies, and preaches. That means that just like a cop’s wife, or a soldier’s wife, I handle the running of the home. I’m the HearthKeeper. I do everything else so that he can be free to work and study. I get the tires changed (what I’m doing while I write this). I do the accounting, cleaning, cooking, and social planning. I take care of wardrobes and rest. I am the HearthKeeper to my warrior.
So no. I don’t think it’s strange that I love Warrior Stories. I just hope I can inspire you to love them too.
What are your top five favorite movies? Have any war movies had a big impact on you?

What influences your writing?

Emily, over at Living In Heaven’s Shadow, did a post about the top 7 influencers of her writing. I thought this was a great idea and decided to put my own little list together.

As a writer, I have been influenced by:

  1. J. R. R. Tolkien’s world-building, descriptions, and beautiful friendships
  2. Pastor Jarrett Down’s spiritual descriptions used in his sermons
  3. The pain, suffering, and bonding of Band of Brothers
  4. The Viking mythology found in Amon Amarth
  5. The beauty of the warriorhood of Watership Down
  6. The pain of losing someone while you’re talking to them in 3000 Degrees by Sean Flynn
  7. Lone Survivors‘ heartache, brotherhood, and “never out of the fight” mentality

Runners up are:

-Mumford and Sons’ first two albums: I could build stories out of every one of their songs

-Firefly: gotta have a crew

-The Wingfeather Saga by Andrew Peterson: stories that feel like coming home

-Mindhunter by John Douglas: creating the best and creepiest villians

-The Book of the Dun Cow, by Walter Wangerin Jr.: there is nothing I don’t love about this book

-Stories of the Seventh Son of the Seventh Son: myths are part of who we are

-Dracula by Bram Stoker: monsters can be hunted by Christians


What are your top 7 influences…and runners up? Comment below, or tag this post so I can see your list.