Writing Process–This or That!

I don’t know a writer who doesn’t enjoy talking about their own writing process and hearing how it compares to other writers. I stole this from Katie Philips Creative Services. She’s great and offers lots of wonderful writing services. Check her out!

WRITING PROCESS—THIS OR THAT! What do you need to be most inspired, creative, and productive?

Do you write at home OR at a coffeeshop/cafe? Do you listen to music while you write OR need silence? Do you outline extensively ahead of time OR are you more of a discovery writer? Is your brain fuel of choice tea OR coffee?

1) I love to write in coffee shops just because I find the atmosphere creative. People watching also helps the creative juices flow, but, I do 99% of my writing at home on my couch nest. I’m a big believer in the home. It is the space I work on every day. I am always looking for ways to make my home comfortable, and so if I didn’t write here I would have to realize it’s not comfortable. So, most of my writing happens on Monday morning with my ‘murder’ mug filled with coffee and my pillows and blankets around me.

2) I usually listen to music. I have a Warrior playlist that is music from some of my favorite war movies and shows. I have a Writing playlist that is all sorts of music from different movies. And, I have two different playlists that are all songs that inspired parts of stories, or summed up parts of stories. The first two are mostly just music and no singing. The others are all singing and almost no just music. I have found that if I’m struggling with a scene, I will shut off the music. Silence and talking to myself helps. 🙂

3) I’m a discovery writer for sure. I will usually have a nebulous, fuzzy, wibbly-wobbly goal in mind that I’m aiming for, or a relationship I’m exploring, but the closest I get to an outline is when I doe a fairy tale retelling. Otherwise, the first rough draft version is a story I’m telling myself, which I kinda love.

4) Coffee all the way. Coffee is a long standing tradition in my family and so a cup of coffee is more than just fuel, it is something that has been passed down for several generations. It is something we share. Coffee is a hug in the mug. Writing just doesn’t feel right without it…unless I can make a cocktail, have a beer, or a glass of wine and right. That is equally acceptable.

What about you? What’s your writing process? Which would you choose?


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Also, keep an eye out for future announcements about my Patreon. I will be updating it soon with more manageable rewards and some great goals and plans. Thank you for supporting me no matter what, through the loquacious times and the dead zone times. Thanks for reading!

Little Bear’s Missing Ears

Visit Faerie-stories.com to read this adorable short story about a pair of lost ears.

“Now,” Aunt Abby said, “this is a story for the three littles.”

“Why?” Jules plucked at the old familiar quilt laying in the grass. The Texas spring sun glinted in her earrings.

“Yeah,” Ellie said. “That’s not fair.”

“It is fair, ‘cause I wrote you many many stories when you were little, but I haven’t written these three many stories.”

Bruce and Jude, Constance and Joshua, Jules and Ellie, Imogene and Remi, and Rook grumbled and complained, frowned and fretted.

“Go on, go use your heads and have an adventure.”

“An adventure?” Constance asked.

“We have to go use our imaginations.” Imogene sounded out the long word slowly making sure she said it right.

Remi sighed dramatically.

“I’m a Spiderman!” shouted Jude.

“I’m a dragon!” Bruce breathed fire, flapping his wings.

“I’m Kilo Ren!” Joshua followed behind him waving his arms as he summoned the Force.

“I’m a one-eyed squid!” Rook gave Aunt Abby an over-done eyebrow wiggle.

In a flash, the nine oldest cousins raced off into wild daydreams of superheroes and mythical creatures.

“Now,” Aunt Abby said again, passing out cookies and water to Shannon, Finley, and Iona. “This is a story for the three littles.”

Little Bear

Once upon a time, Little Bear lost her ears.

Finley gasped. “Oh no!” She felt on top of her own head to make sure her hat with bear ears sat firmly on her little red head.

Aunt Abby cleared her throat.

Once upon a time, Little Bear lost her ears.

She searched in her bed.

Under the blankets?

Under her pillows?

Under her pink shark?

Finley grinned. “It’s my pink shark.”

“Shhhh,” said Shannon.

Where had her ears gone?

Little Bear sighed, close to tears.

“Where, oh where, are my ears?”

She hurried to the living room on her little legs.

Under the couch?

Under the chairs?

Under her puppy?

“Phoebe!” Iona laughed. “Ruff-ruff.”

“She barked!” Shannon grinned, giving Iona a little hug.

Not to be outdone, Finley also gave Iona a hug.

“Back to the story!” Aunt Abby said.

Where had her ears gone?

Little Bear cried and cried for her missing ears.

“Where have they gone?”

She peeked in the kitchen filled with yummy smells.

In the cabinet with the snacks?

In the dishwasher?

Gasp! In the oven?

Where had her ears gone?

Little Bear crumpled into a sorrowful puddle, for what is a bear without two little ears?

“Hello, Finley.” Mama Bear came in from the laundry room.

“It is me! I’m a bear.”

“Your hoodie is all clean.”

Mama Bear held out the brown, furry hoodie with two little ears.

“My ears!” Little Bear squealed, all her tears forgotten.

She pulled on the sweater and pulled up the hood, her ears right where they should be. And Little Bear was a bear again.

“And they all lived happily ever after, until the wash had to be done again.”

“Happily ever after!” Finley squeezed her own ears on the top of her head.

“Did you like the story?” Aunt Abby asked.

“I liked the story.” Finley nodded.

“I liked the cookie,” Shannon said. “But I don’t have ears.”

“Yes, you do!” Aunt Abby gently tugged both her ears.

“Ears!” Iona pointed to her own ears.

“She said ears!” Shannon clapped her hands.

“She’s very smart, just like you.” Aunt Abby gathered the three up in a hug, then sent them to go run after the big kids, ears, cookies, and stories all where they should be.

*The End*

Quote of the Weekend

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Courtesy of Pinterest.

I don’t know anything about the author of this quote, but I did find this quote beautiful and encouraging. Whose life turns out like you planned or thought it would? The point is to trust the writer of your story, and be content with how He is telling it.

Quote of the Weekend

Quote from Fortress by Abby Jones

Monday I’m going to talk about one of my sub-genres in my Worlds Before the Door genre: Huntsman and HearthKeeper stories.

This is a quote from my story Fortress. I hope you’ll join me as I explore what lead me to write this type of story, and why I love it.

Quote of the Weekend

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Courtesy of Pinterest.

Another adorable one by Charlie Mackesy. I love the penguin flying because he’s riding a horse. As you know, horse are fitted into almost all my stores, for they are my very favorite animal of all time. I’ve loved them since I was a little girl.

Quote of the Weekend

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Courtesy of Pinterest.

I just randomly found Charlie Mackesy on Pinterest and I really like his horse stuff. He often includes other animals. It’s all very cute.

This is why it's important to read good books!

Why Brave?

 

This is why it's important to read good books!
Image from Pixabay. Edits by me.

 

This is one of my favorite lines.

I’m sure we’ve all heard some variation of this line from different sources. I first heard it from my Mom. It is the reason I write Children’s Stories, MG Stories, and YA Stories. It’s the reason books intended for a young audience are some of my favorites.

Life is hard. Life is often scary.

Children can’t be protected from everything. It’s impossible to keep evil influences and harm from your children. You are only one human being. You can’t be there when nightmares come. You can’t be there when they make stupid decisions that put them in dark places. You can’t be there every waking moment.  And, you shouldn’t be. Children don’t grow up by being protected.

But!!!!

Children can be armed.

Children can be trained. Children can be groomed for the fight that is this life.

Stories are a great way to prepare kids for the things they will face as they go out in the world.

 

Why Fairy Tales are important.
Image from Pixabay. Edits by me.

 

I’m not really into Issue Driven fiction. I wasn’t as a kid, and I don’t write it. I read and write Fantasy. Why? How does that help Children be Brave?

Fantasy gives kids and young adults something fun to read that they can hold onto while also escaping the hardships or humdrum around them. As a pre-teen, I had no interest in reading about kids struggling with drugs. I did want to read every Hardy Boys I could get my hands on. I didn’t want to read about someone’s sparkly boyfriend, but I did want to read about Sam and Frodo’s struggles through Mordor.

Then I grew up. I grew up and found out I wasn’t going to solve crimes, or be asked to go on some epic adventure. I was going to get married, co-own a business with my husband, struggle in my marriage, struggle with infertility, sell our business, learn to manage my home, have health issues, and then stand shoulder to shoulder with my husband as he took on a pastorate. None of that is as thrilling as journeying through Moria, or fighting the great and evil General Woundwort, or sailing with Fin Button.

But it is all hard.

What has encouraged me, outside of Scripture? What has the Lord used during dark days?

Stories.

 

Favorite Quotes
Image from Pixabay. Edits by me.

 

When things are dark and hard, I am reminded of all my heroes who carried on. I’m reminded of all the warriors I’ve read of, big and small, strong and weak. I’m reminded of Sam, my favorite hero, only a gardener far from home. I’m reminded of Bigwig who followed Hazel faithfully, even though he was stronger than Hazel. I’m reminded of Jane Eyre, who did what was right when it hurt.  I recall story after story after story that my Mom read to me, handed to me, recommend to me, where the heroes didn’t stop. They kept moving forward. They kept pushing. They endured to the end.

Darkness is a passing thing.
Image from Pixabay. Edits by me.

This is the gift I want to give to others. I want other children, pre-teens, and teens to be able to read Jonah’s story, and then look at their normal, ordinary struggles and carry on. I want my faerie stories to be encouraged them to keep fighting even when it hurts. I want them to have heroes who defeat the dragons…or in my case the clowns. 😉

I want to write stories that help kids be brave before they have to be, because they will have to be some day, probably sooner rather than later.