Favorite Lines

Jonah climbed up the pile of trash and bodies. He grabbed the high edge of the RoadBlock and pulled up. The pushing fight between the gangs rose back around him. Bullets zinged. Explosions grunted. Hand-to-hand combat gasped. Flames snapped. Death-cries of boys and girls accented it all. Jonah couldn’t smell, but he knew what he should smell: hot rubber, dirty water freed by heat, singed hair, and the cooked end of man.

I have recently finished doing a quick read through The Cost of Two Hands. Now, I’m reading The Sparrow and The Star. My goal is to finish it before the end of the year. I love the Sparrow and the Star, even with all the work it needs. It may be my favorite book written, thus far. Jonah has come into his own, there is so much darkness laced with so much hope. I love it.

I also love this paragraph. It’s dark and hard, but it is a paragraph I would grab my pen and highlight if this was a book off a shelf, and not one I had written. I just love this paragraph.

Favorite Lines

Another one of my favorite lines from The Cost of Two Hands:

Oak closed his eyes. Pain’s words reverberated through him. Keep Fighting. Keep Fighting. Did deep roots and life-giving water depend on other Guardians and other men? No. It was the King who kept the waters moving. It was the King who brought the unborn to this world. It was the King who gave Oak his powers and his responsibility. That hadn’t changed just because Oak was chained in the Mall. He had still been chosen to be the Forest Guardian. He had been chosen to hold Bree even if for a moment, and he had been chosen to be here. Just because here had tortures unbearable didn’t mean here was the end. And if it was the end? Joy! For he would take the last road through the final Door to the World Beyond. There was nothing Pain could do to change any of that.

Favorite Lines

I’m reading through The Cost of Two Hands in preparation for starting Book 3 of the Artists Return, Heir of Greenhome.

These are some of my favorite lines:

“Yes. I gave my heart to a woman. She loved eight men and when the last one was safe or dead, or both, she left.”

 “Sounds like a bit of a floozy if you ask me,” Presto muttered, getting another pointed glare from Gus.

“No. No. Not grown men. There was only one grown man. The rest were growing men, her growing men. Her boys.”

Gus gulped. “She had seven sons. You gave your heart to the mother of seven sons?”

“No. I gave my heart to a woman with a strong face and a heart for trees. I gave it to Bree.”

Crumpled and Thrown Aside

Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

I’m going to try and start posting on my blogs again. I had to step back cause of life, you know. My writing has also taken a major step back, but I have found ways of fitting it in here and there, in the cracks and crevasse of my life. In the spirit of posting again, I wanted to share a bit that got slashed, thrown out, tossed from my current WIP: The Stars are Still There. I had a whole scene in an antique store that just didn’t fit with the story, but I was very pleased with this description, so I wanted to share it.

(I’m not going to worry about giving you all the links to follow me on social media because I’m just not active on social media much any more, so just enjoy this, comment, and share as you please.)

The musty smell of old things—wood, cloth, leather, plastic, and glass—settled down around them. A wild menagerie of the past sat in every corner shelf, crook, hook, and socket available. Dishes filled with all the nostalgia of Grandma’s kitchen and home cooked meals. Clothing besotted with lace and glamor. Long gone games, music, and movie stars. Knick-knacks, baubles, and jewelry from an age of craft long forgotten in the age of mass production. Each once loved. Each once carefully selected to grace a home, or a woman, or given to a friend, but the story that they told, their storytellers were long ago buried and forgotten. The children’s children shed the burden of things, the soul connection severed by death and memories lost.
Now, in the crooks and on the hooks, piled, stacked, hidden, displayed, they wait, empty, alone, they wait for new connections or the final regulation to dust and decay. They wait to joyously find use, or the discarding into rubbish.
Imrie ran her hands over the glass cabinet displaying brooches, from garish to sublime.

Quote of the Weekend

Image from Pixabay, layout from Canva.

Fortunatus is one of my favorite characters. He’s an evil villain who experiences an undeserved rescue and is saved. He’s my first saved villain. He is a redeemed unlit and I love him.

Quote of the Weekend

Quote by me! Image from Pixabay.

I’m not fond at all of the idea of a leap of faith. Our faith isn’t unfounded. It’s based on the works of the Lord, his promises, and his Word. It isn’t blind. It isn’t just faith in faith so that we all have warm fuzzes. Faith is based on truth, God’s truth.

This is a line from my book The Sparrow and the Star. It is book two of the Artists Return series, and still in the editing stage. I have a handful of beta readers going over it right now and I’m excited (and terrified) to find out what they think. But, this is one of my favorite lines. The Sparrow and the Star has far more hope bleeding through the pages than any other book I’ve written. The amount of hope has actually surprised me. I’m normally a very gritty writer, but this book is a bright light of hope. It’s also, surprisingly, one of my favorite books. I love every bit of it. It makes me excited for book 3, if all my readers don’t abandon me for its lack of grit and grim.

Random Thoughts

Courtesy of Pinterest.

I found this image the other day on Pinterest and it made me smile. Seeing Edward Norton and James McAvoy together isn’t just seeing to great actors hanging out, it’s seeing two of my characters together.

Writer’s do this weird thing where we pick out actors who would play our characters if our books were ever turned into movies. Sometimes, it also helps us solidify a character’s personality and looks. You do have to be careful that it doesn’t put you or your readers in a box. Everyone sees their favorite characters a little differently.

For me, James McAvoy would play a young Stan. Stan is a journalist who stumbles onto a unique private eye firm that doesn’t hunt down cheating husbands or missing heiresses. This firm hunts monsters and things that go bump in the night. It’s led by a WW2 vet, an unlit, and helped by the SoulKeeper Guardian (whose powers have been split). Stan gets pulled into the dark world of serial killers and rogue Guardians. By the end of his story he’s found love, but he’s also lost almost all his friends. Stan is responsible for raising Crow the Half-Breed, half unlit and half SoulKeeper Guardian. 

Edward Norton would play Stan’s son Ronan. Ronan comes on the scene years later, surprising Stan who didn’t know he had a son. Ronan finds Stan at the same time he inherits the SoulDefender/Preacher powers fully united. This draws Ronan into the same dark world Stan was drawn into. Ronan must shoulder the souls of his world with the help of the Deacons and the Huntsman.

Seeing this picture is like seeing happier days when Stan and Ronan would have been together. It’s like seeing father and son as two young men, as friends, just having fun. So. I kinda love this picture. Not because of the actors, but because of what they represent to me.